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Windows

Very concerned about standard of work on an ongoing installation

On 17th/18th Aug Fensa registered company sent two installers to install a lintel above a kitchen window and replace the window. Expanding foam on one course of bricks was used when replacing brick work - and this appears to have allowed a row of existing bricks to have developed a crack in the mortar line above. Is it acceptable to use expanding foam when resetting bricks then smear a thin coating of mortar over them? The next day the row of bricks above the window are tipping forward.

The survey measurement for window width is four frame units 620mm. The fitter seemed to be having difficulty making them fit - and we frequently said the bow shape was more curved and different. We have since measured the frame units and they are only 600mm. This means we have large gaps at each side which has been filled with expanding foam, covered with trim and then an excessive unsightly thick line of brown sealant used.

Within an hour of them leaving a piece of board that had been siliconed under the sill fell off. This revealed a large gap between the brick line and the window shelf/sill. Over 20mm. There is no insulation board which we were led to understand would be used. All in all we are very unsatisfied with the job so far and have sent numerous emails and photos to the company. I have also spoken to a manager who assured me my concerns were being taken seriously. The state of play is that next Wednesday a different engineer will come to assess the work thus far, and do any repairs/work that he can do. I have made the manager aware that the Windows supplied are not the width that the surveyor recommended, and said I think they needed to be reordered and the job reworked.

No money has exchanged hands yet - so no Fensa certificate will be issued until work is completed and monies paid. We had hoped for a more speedy response to the issues but we have to wait till next Wednesday.

So what do you think? Am I expecting too much to expect new frames to be provided to the width they should be. Is supplying Windows the wrong size ie 'not as described' classed as a breach of contract under the consumer rights act. I understand the company must repair or replace depending on cost - but how do you repair a window frame that is too small. ( I do not consider using packers acceptable). I wish I could add photos so that you can see the poor workmanship that has been carried out but didn't seem able to.

Appreciate response from TLC - I have sent emails to Fensa and tried to contact by phone only to be put through to a full answer machine that could not take a message. Seeking advice on here seems only way to get an idea of whether what we’ve experienced is acceptable practice before next Wednesday. Thank you.

4 Answers from MyBuilder Window & Door Fitters

Best Answer

Firstly the lintel should have cement put along the top then when lifted in it beds the bricks above on to it, then cement is put under the lintel to bed onto the bricks.
Secondly it’s common practice to make the windows 10mm smaller overall than the brick opening. Plastic packers are inserted to make it a tight fit before frame fixings are drilled in, obviously cavity closers are needed on a cavity wall. Then expanding foam is used in the minimal gap that’s left, then you silicone the cover trims on. But the silicon won’t stick to expanding foam.
I hope this helps. I’m not fensa registered but know what I’m doing!!!

2020-08-22T16:31:16+01:00

Answered 22nd Aug 2020

Given that the firm is FENSA registered; best to contact them. It’s not really fair to either party for an outsider to deliver a verdict not having seen the work.

2020-08-22T16:38:01+01:00

Answered 22nd Aug 2020

Is this a bow window or flat window I dont fully understand question as you mention bow if it is bow window any crack could be improper use or non use of acro prop,the size you say seems be 20mm to small this IF it's a bow could be explained by room being left 1 to fit and 2 to fit bow jointing sections (baypoles in my neck of woods)if it's a flat window tube excess gap could be due to survey ie I measure top middle then bottom it could be somewhere in that opening ie the middle a brick is sticking out more so they have gone of that brick which would make frame smaller its very hard to say with out pics though

2020-09-12T18:10:03+01:00

Answered 12th Sep 2020

The previous comment was a good answer, and couldn’t disagree with anything he said
However I would like to add, it is in breach of Fensa terms and conditions to hold back a certificate of client hasn’t paid. Likewise as a Fensa user they should have a complaints Formal procedure. Ask for a copy of that first and follow what it says.
Finally if you do finish up having to sue to company in question the judge will want to see that you gave the window company opportunity to correct it

2020-09-21T17:25:03+01:00

Answered 21st Sep 2020

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