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Central Heating

Did removing a radiator cause my boiler to go on fire?

My builder removed a radiator and left the pipes uncapped 3 days ago. We continued to use hot water and heating during this time as we were unaware of this. The boiler had drained and overheated resulting in a fire at the top of the boiler at the fan and air pressure valve. The builders are saying this was a coincidence and not accepting responsibility. Are they right or was the fire a direct result of their actions.

7 Answers from MyBuilder Heating Engineers

Best Answer

Hi,

I would wholeheartedly suggest you have a gas safe registered business look at this for you.

2019-09-29T10:48:44+01:00

Answered 29th Sep 2019

Sounds like the boiler safety device failed

2019-09-29T21:20:02+01:00

Answered 29th Sep 2019

You can remove any radiator and still use the boiler afterwards. Pipes should be capped. If they didn’t cap the pipes this would cause a leak and boiler to dry it’s self out which in my view looks that way. I would highly suggest a gas safe engineer to look at this issue but the builders look to be at fault here

2019-09-30T15:50:03+01:00

Answered 30th Sep 2019

Even if it was a coincidence, how can you leave heating pipes uncapped? The heating system will run dry. The builders are definitely at fault.

2019-10-03T17:35:02+01:00

Answered 3rd Oct 2019

Removing a radiator would not cause the boiler to set on fire, quite the opposite. If you drain the water from a heating system the boiler would detect the loss of pressure and not fire up. I suspect you have an un related issue with your boiler

2019-10-03T18:45:02+01:00

Answered 3rd Oct 2019

Call the boiler manufacturer and get them to send someone out.

2019-10-05T12:40:02+01:00

Answered 5th Oct 2019

If the radiator as removed and the valves left on and they were closed there would be no loss of system water. Unless they were leaking (they should be capped as a matter of precaution).

If they system had no pressure in it or was empty, the boiler should have cut out or overheated and cut out. So the heating and the hot water wouldn’t have worked anyway, as there was no water in it.

To me it does sound like an unfortunate coincidence, but builders are builders, not plumbing and heating engineers. I would always recommend that tradesman do what they are trained to do, you wouldn’t get a heating engineer building a wall just because he’s bricked a few flues up.

Hope that helps.

2019-10-16T10:15:02+01:00

Answered 16th Oct 2019

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