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Do i have to have a 45a cooker switch?

Hi. I'm currently planning to redo my kitchen and wanting to change all the sockets etc. I'm thinking the 45a cooker switch is pointless because it's left on and therefore I never use it. Can I just remove it and have the cooker wired up directly?

8 Answers from MyBuilder Electricians

Best Answer

Regulatory speaking, there is no mandatory requirement for you to have a cooker isolator. Cookers can be wired directly into the distribution board. That said, it would be prudent to keep the isolator as if a fault were to develop with the cooker, such as an element shorting to earth (which isn't uncommon), the isolator is useful for removing the fault from the rest of the installation. Without the isolator, there is a good chance the fault may trip an RCD at the distribution board (if it has one) which might not be re-settable until an electrician attends to open up the distribution board and remove the circuit from there.

In short, keeping the isolator, although not required, may well save you a load of money and bother further down the line.

2015-08-16T19:35:02+01:00

Answered 16th Aug 2015

I would leave it in, as local point of isolation is advised. If you do not like the look of it, you could always have it moved into a neighbouring cupboard.
If your current 45 amp isolator has a neon light, you could always change it for a none neon to save energy. I hope this helps.

2015-08-06T08:55:02+01:00

Answered 6th Aug 2015

Dear sir,
This all depends upon the wattage of your newer replacement cooker. The replacement cooker may need the current carrying capabilities that that particular 45 Amp switch offers I know its ugly but its functional and no please don't wire a domestic cooker up directly to ring mains either. Please get a professional electrician in you may keep your life and property longer my friend. or phone me our advice is always free and for your best interests at heart.
Other Tips: ps all new sockets should be protected by a RCD, also keep all sockets away from the sinks its amazing how many people dont then the spray from the tap or awkward plate soaks the socket .ooopps

2015-08-06T08:55:02+01:00

Answered 6th Aug 2015

In short No. By doing away with the 45amp isolator, you would be creating an electrical defect and the installation would not comply with BS7671:2008 as it would not be possible to isolate the cooker for safety reasons (e.g. in an emergency or when being cleaned/repaired etc). Strongly advise against removing it!

2015-08-06T18:35:02+01:00

Answered 6th Aug 2015

Do not remove the cooker switch, this is an important local point of isolation for the cooker. It also probably indicates that the cable is running concealed down the wall in that location. If you remove the switch you will contravene electrical regulations. All electrical work in a kitchen must also be certified under part P, either by a self certifying competent person or via building control notification.

Hope that helps regards Mark

2015-08-06T08:55:02+01:00

Answered 6th Aug 2015

A 45 amp double pole cooker switch is used as a means of local isolation. This is useful for maintenance, cleaning and periodic inspection and testing purposes. It is also used a a means of emergency isolation in case of a fire in the cooker for example.

In my opinion it is good practice to install an isolator switch.

Hope this helps

Brendan Mines

2015-08-06T08:55:02+01:00

Answered 6th Aug 2015

No,as an appliance like a cooker has to have local isolation for maintenance and safety purposes, as it is double pole, ie, isolates live and neutral.

2015-08-06T08:55:02+01:00

Answered 6th Aug 2015

no this is not good practise if there is a fault with the cooker you can atleast turn it off with a switch. what would you do if the cooker became live??? quickest thing to do would be to turn if off. also its good to save energy by turning the cooker off

2015-08-06T08:55:02+01:00

Answered 6th Aug 2015

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