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What size cable and breaker?

Hi all.
I am going to be fitting an induction hob in my new kitchen and was wondering if anybody could tell me what size cable and breaker it will need?
The Hob is a 240v, 7200 W NEFF, the cable length will be around 10m.

6 Answers from MyBuilder Electricians

Best Answer

Firstly you need to look online of visit your local authority building control office and register your intent to carry out DIY electrical work in the home. This is because since 2005, electrical work in the kitchen is notifiable under part P of the building regulations. (Failure to comply with the regulations can result in a £5000 fine).

Once you have paid the relevant fee (typically around £200) you will be given consent to proceed. As 7200w (7.2kw) divided by the voltage 230v = 31.06amps, a 6mm twin and earth cable with a BSEN60898 type B MCB will be sufficient for the circuit. If the cable is being flushed into the wall and plastered over then it will also need to be RCD protected using a BSEN61008 or BSEN61009 RCD (30ma type). You will also need to use a 45amp double pole isolator switch at the hob end.

Once you have finished the job, contact the local authority again and pay any additional fees, and then an inspector will come out and tcheck/test your work and issue you with a Part P building compliance certificate.

You may find however that its far cheaper to hire a part p registered electrician who can self certify their work.

2013-01-07T08:15:01+00:00

Answered 7th Jan 2013

10mm twin and earth and 40 amp breaker. This will be a new circuit which must be done by an electrician and notified to building regs

2013-01-03T15:55:01+00:00

Answered 3rd Jan 2013

"The rating of the circuit is determined by the assessment of the current demand of the cooking appliance(s), and cooker control unit(s) in accordance with Table A1 of Appendix A. A 32A circuit is usually appropriate for household or similar cookers of rating up to 15KW in modern appliances due to intelligent power sharing technology.

A circuit of rating exceeding 15A but not exceeding 50A may supply two or more cooking appliances where these are installed in same room.

IEE Regs Appendix H4

CIVIL Electrical Services
NICEIC Approved Contractor

2013-01-05T09:50:02+00:00

Answered 5th Jan 2013

6mm T+E will do this job with a 32A breaker needs to be protected by 30ma RCD
This covers the entire load without even needing to take into account allowance for diversity but as is stated it does HAVE TO BE DONE BY A REGISTERED ELECTRICIAN OR NOTIFIED PRIOR TO WORK COMENCEMENT TO BUILDING CONTROL.
KEVIN.

2013-01-04T09:55:01+00:00

Answered 4th Jan 2013

Electrical installations in kitchens (special zones) are notifiable to building control and therefor will require a part p contractor to carry this work out and sign off.. The earthing arraignment to MET and GAS/Water will need to be up to current requirements and you will need to complete an inspection and test of the new circuit with certification. The new circuit will require RCD protection also. I'd advise on getting a qualified electrician for this job.

2013-01-07T07:30:02+00:00

Answered 7th Jan 2013

Electrical installations in kitchens are notifiable to building control. The earthing will need to be up to current requirements and you will need to complete an inspection and test of the new circuit with certification. The new circuit will require residual current protection also. I'd advise on getting a qualified electrician in if you are unsure of cable size and overcurrent protection.

2013-01-03T16:45:02+00:00

Answered 3rd Jan 2013

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