Groundwork & Foundations Question

How would you go about addressing a 6 foot high ,20 foot long severely bowing brick garden wall please?

I live on a hill and the wall in question is holding a sizable amount of earth on the other side as my garden and subsequent ones, step down as you get lower down the hill.I would say at least 3 foot of earth on the other side.
it is a very old wall and bows out in the middle.I have lived here 16 years and although the problem has not worsened over the years, that I have noticed, it is a worry .if you can also advise what approx. costs might be involved here?....really just an idea to see if it is affordable and what sort of builder would you approach to do this kind of work?
thank you

2 Answers

Best Answer

I would take the wall down, if the bricks are salvagable clean them of and stack for reuse.
As you say the wall is 16yr old, and maybe older,I wouldnt imagine the footings are up to much.
You have quite a bit of weight behind the wall so my suggestion would be to excavate new footings.
Place starter bars in the concrete, while still wet, lay 225mm hollow blocks, slotted over the bars (this will stop the wall kicking out ).
Build in wall ties to the front face of blockwork to tie into the brick wall, which will be the finish face.
Infill the hollows with concrete.

You can also lay some drainge pipe behind the wall, bedded in P gravel this will help with the drainage, also leave some weep holes.

As for the cost, it needs to be seen, you should really place your request on this site in the Post a Job Section.

Answered 26th Apr 2011

B J D BUILDING/ROOFING

Member since 29 Oct 2008

Morning Wendy.
Steve from Abstract Building Co in Reading.
I would suggest you would need to ease the pressure on the wall by removing the soil against the wall.
Dissmantle the wall, cleaning the bricks as you go.
Remove all debris arising from the dissmantling.
Check the foundations are in good order, if not, then replace with new.
Rebuild the wall using the same bricks, with a 4sand 1cement ratio mortar.
Price would depend on access, is the wall 100mm or .220mm thick etc.
It might also be an idea to approach your insurance company.
I would be very unproffessional of me to give you a quote without surveying the site, but am willing to come over when ever is convenient for you.
Hope this information is helpful, and look forward to your reply.

Regards
Steve Gale
Abstract Building Co

Answered 26th Apr 2011

Abstract Building Co

Member since 8 Mar 2010

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