Chimneys & Fireplaces Question

Chimney stack in apparently poor condition

During a routine loft inspection it is apparent that the chimney stack appears to be in a poor state of repair. The mortar is very dry and powdery and there are deep sections (possibly as much as 50-70mm) where the mortar is absent.

Many bricks have started to fracture apart. One or two bricks have lost up to 50% of the cross section.

At ground floor level within the loft (first floor ceiling level) the brickwork appears to be in good condition although this would need to be verified. I have not carried out a roof level inspection.

It should be noted that the chimney is used to vent a gas fire although this is currently disconnected. However, I am actively seeking to get the fire reconnected in the very near future.

I guess what I am seeking is some advice on the typical remedial measures that might be employed and ball park costs to rectify.

Happy to answer any questions.

Regards

David

3 Answers

Best Answer

THE FIRST THING IS TO HIRE A ROOFER WHO WILL USE SCAFFOLDING (ALL GOOD ROOFERS DO) TO CARRY OUT ANY CHIMNEY WORK THIS IS A REQUIRMENT OF BUILDING REGULATIONS.
DO NOT HIRE ANY ROOFER WHO USES JUST LADDERS THE PRICE MAY BE A LITTLE CHEAPER BUT IT IS NOT SAFE AND THE WORK IS NOT ALWAYS THAT GOOD AND IS LESS PROFESSIONAL.

THE PRICE TO REPOINT DEPENDS ON THE HIGHT OF THE CHIMNEY STACK AND THE CONDITION ALSO HOW MENY BRICKS NEED REPLACING.
BUT PRICE IS BETWEEN £150 AND £450 UPTO 25 BRICKS HIGH.
ITS BEST TO GET QUOTES FROM ROOFERS WITH NOT LESS THAN 10 CHIMNEY FEEDBACKS AND ONES THAT USE SCAFFOLDING,
HOPE THIS HAS BEEN OF HELP
PROPERTY-REPAIRS

Answered 9th Jan 2012

REPOINTING / PROPERTY-REPAIRS

Member since 15 Jan 2010

Hi Davebee,

Your stack is in need of re-pointing, and has been for a while by the sounds of it. Any seriously damaged bricks should be removed and replaced at this point. Do not attempt to re-connect the appliance with the brickwork in its current condition! It is likely that if it is bad as you have described, it will more than likely have deteriorated in other areas as as well and you could well be pumping carbon monoxide into bedrooms etc. Best thing to do is get the brickwork sorted, and then have a pressure test carried out on the flue - this will determine if it is safe for you to use the old chimney or not.

It is a two man job and will require roof access so will normally be chargeable, if it passes the pressure test you have saved hundreds and can connect your appliance. If it fails you know your chimney is leaking and you then need to get a liner installed.

Pointing costs will vary depending on size of area that is required, could be anything from £50 for patch pointing to a few hundred if its a big area with a lot of bricks. Lining costs will very much depend on your property and the output of your appliance. Class II flues (5") start from about £3-400 depending on where you are in the country, Class 1 flues (7") can be £650-£750 and require a hole to be made in the chimney just above the appliance (could be done from outside if property allows).

Always use a HETAS installer if it needs lining so you can have a certificate of compliance!

Kind regards,

Martyn

Answered 9th Jan 2012

Chimney Care & repair Ltd

Member since 4 Jul 2011

The stack needs to come right down to good solid masonry and rebuilt, as for cost you need someone out to assess it, it will need scaffolding.

Answered 9th Jan 2012

B J D BUILDING/ROOFING

Member since 29 Oct 2008

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