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Electrical

i have had a problem in one room of my flat for many months now. the fuse keeps blowing when i switch on the light, and when i replace it then it almost instantly breaks again.

The light is on the ceiling and has four halogen bulbs. At Christmas we tested the voltage (which seemed fine), replaced the light switch and tried again with several fuses, but although on occasion they last for a couple of days, they very quickly blow again (sometimes immediately). We also removed one or two of the bulbs to see if that would reduce the current loading, but that still didn’t help.
Someone suggested to me that there may be a groundfault somewhere in the circuit, and I would like to get this checked out and repaired.

I was wondering whether it does sound like a groundfault and whether or not that is a big job for an electrician to under take? What kind of time/expense would I be looking at for paying an electrician?

2 Answers from MyBuilder Electricians

Best Answer

If a fuse blows there is usually a fault to keep replacing fuses and trying to guess what is wrong is very dangerous you may well cause a fire or electrocution!
I often hear people say I have been switching my breaker back on every couple of hours this is sooo dangerous 99 times out of a hundred if your fuse or breaker goes off twice or blows twice you should believe that you require an electrician to find out why and correct the fault please do not keep repairing or replacing or switching back on the circuit call an electrician you would not keep turning on a tap if you had a leak you would call a plumber.
Re cost the most awkward faults usually take less than 2 hours to find then there may be additional costs but once found an estimate to fix should be obtained so you no the final cost
put the job up on this site asap in the meantime leave the circuit off and use some table lamps

2011-08-25T11:55:01+01:00

Answered 25th Aug 2011

From what you describe the heat from the halogen lamps has almost certainly bunrt/damaged the wiring behind the lampholders where the lamps fit into. This has created a short circuit and hence the fuse is blowing. The only real way to sort this is to get someone in to carry out an insulation resistance test and repair the damaged wiring or install a new light fitting. Its most likely been caused by using lamps with too high a wattage, e.g. 50w lamps in a 35w maximum light fitting.

2011-10-18T00:20:18+01:00

Answered 18th Oct 2011

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