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Q

Does a socket above a cooker need to be moved?

Part P of the Building Regulations states that there should be no outlets or accessories (cooker hoods excluded!) above any type of hob, nor within 300mm of the edge of the hob. Any socket outlet should be fitted so that it's centre is a minimum of 150mm above the top of the worktop.

The existing kitchen was installed some time ago so probably would not have had the same constraints in force at that time. The bottom edge of the socket is 620mm above the cooker and the wall is tiled.

I need to fit a new cooker - do I have to move the socket before installation of the new cooker?

Ysuecap 8th Apr, 2013 Electrical
1 Answer u1
A

Firstly I think you may have got slightly confused as Part P of the building regulations deals with "Notifiable Electrical Works" and the "Certification Process" it does not go into specific detail about the height or placement of sockets and switches itself but does make reference to Part M of the building regulations that deals with the Access and Usage of buildings including heights of sockets and switches.

All electrical work should conform to BS78671:2008 as amended to January 2011, and the current location of the cooker panel being directly behind the cooker, so that you have to reach over a hot hob to isolate the power in an emergency is not compliant with the current regulations and would be a code C2 if highlighted on an Electrical Installation Condition Report (C2 = Potential Danger)

It is not mandatory to move the cooker panel, but if you have a new cooker installed and connected to it you may find that some installers/companies (Currys, John Lewis etc) will refuse to connect it as it is classed as unsafe, however the best way forward is to state that you accept that there is a risk and that the defect/risk is clearly detailed on the Minor Electrical Works Certificate that's issued. Provided you then sign to accept it as it is, the installer is not liable should you make any future claim against him/her if you burnt yourself when reaching over the hot hob.

Part P 2013 - http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/uploads/br/BR_PDF_AD_P_2013.pdf

Electrical Safety Services 9th Apr, 2013
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